ECHO 10 :: Donald Miller

Posted by | July 29, 2010 | ECHO 2010 | 8 Comments
Donald Miller grew up in Houston, Texas, in the shadow of the Astrodome, next to a cow pasture. When he was a kid, his single mother took him to a Southern Baptist church because she couldn’t afford reform school, which is probably why he writes about religious themes. He left Houston at 21 in a Volkswagen van, and later wrote a book about his trip called Through Painted Deserts. In his travels, he ran out of money in Portland, Oregon where he audited classes at Reed College, then selected as the most godless campus in the country. He wrote a book about that experience called Blue Like Jazz that eventually became a New York Times Bestseller and is now being made into a movie. Don then followed up with the best-selling Searching for God Knows What. After thirty-years of no interaction with his father, Don found his biological dad and wrote about it in a book called To Own a Dragon, which is being re-released in Spring 2010 under the title Father Fiction. About that time, he started The Mentoring Project, an organization that seeks to respond to the American crisis of fatherlessness by inspiring and equipping faith communities to mentor fatherless boys. Don’s work with The Mentoring Project led the Obama administration to invite him onto the President’s task force on fatherlessness and mentoring. Last year, along with the Ride:Well Team, Don rode his bicycle across America in an effort to raise money to drill wells in Sub-Saharan Africa. This experience, along with the writing of the screenplay for Blue Like Jazz, provided material for his newest book, A Million Miles in a Thousand Years (also a New York Times Bestseller) for which Don spent the fall of 2009 promoting on a 65 city national bus tour. He is a frequent speaker at National Conferences and Universities across the country. He has appeared at such diverse events as Women of Faith Conference and The Democratic National Convention. He lives in Portland, Oregon with his dog Lucy.
Note: Got here a few minutes late, so I missed the opening!
  • Great managers help people see not only the purpose of their work but also how each person’s work influence and relates to the purpose of the organization and its outcomes.
  • Companies with high engagement levels had a 19% increase in operating income and almost 28% growth in earnings per share.
  • If a company’s goal is associated with helping people there’s an increase
  • Having your associates better engaged in your project promotes growth.
  • Engaged employers believe they can impact customer satisfaction.
  • Engaged employees believe they can impact the profitability of the organization.
  • How do we better engage the people we work with?
  • We need to see projects not as projects but as narratives.
  • What really engages the human mind is a story.
  • Do we like the elements of the narratives we hear?
  • We frame ideas as narratives to deceive and manipulate people.
  • There’s a lot of companies that do technology but Apple has a compelling narrative.
  • Apple is the Robin Hood of the tech world. They take it from smarties so simple people can use it.
  • TOMS Shoes has an amazing story – giving shoes to children who don’t have any.
  • TOMS makes ok-looking bad shoes but they make an awesome story.
  • We value the story over the inferior product.
  • We have to tell better stories.
  • When you write a project you want to end with a single climactic scene.
  • You start planning with a single climactic scene.
  • If you say you need a new building that seats 5,000 seats but don’t have a story connected to those people you won’t have a compelling story.
  • Your story has to be a picture, not a number.
  • You should be able to draw it on the back of a napkin.
  • A question gets asked in a story — that’s what engages the mind.
  • Will the guy get the girl? Why are they on the island?
  • Will we be able to build this building on time and on budget is a BORING story that people won’t care about.
  • We run our projects that way and expect people to engage in our projects that way.
  • We have to put real people and real life change in the building and symbolize what will happen in that building.
  • We have to put flesh on the idea.
  • The fully-fleshed personal end goal associated with a visual image that is emotionally and intellectually compelling to the point that it instills sacrifice.
  • People walk away from bad stories. They engage with good ones.

Developing Your Single Climatic Scene

  • What project or near term responsibiltiy do you need to create a stroyline for?
  • What are the outcomes you are responsbile for in this effort?
  • Why is this good for your organization, your customers, and your community?
  • Describe one of the many ancillary scenes that can ONLY take place if you’re successful in bringing about the SCS (Ride:Well)
  • Using your answers to the previous four questions, write your Single Climactic Scene

SCS Validating Questions

  • From my associates perspective, why might the SCS not be engaging?
  • Have I captured a scene that employees, stakeholders, and customers can envision?
  • Can my people make an emotional and intellectual connection to my SCS?
  • Does bringing about the SCS mean we’ve accomplished all we are responsible for?

Conflict

  • Conflict is a necessary part of story.
  • It creates the risk.
  • Conflict makes the story question more interesting
  • Our scenes should be impossible without God’s intervention.
  • We have to help people see that life has conflict in it and that God likes conflict.
  • Conflict makes for great stories.
  • Conflict is the forces of resitatnce the heighten tension, increase risk and complicate the actualization of the single climatic scene.
  • There’s a difference between minor conflict and major conflict.

Conflict Questions

  • What are the most obvious major conflicts we’ll encounter as we pursue the SCS?
  • List all major conflicts that you can anticipate. If these go unaddressed, the SCS will not happen.
  • What is the deadline for the SCS?
  • With that deadline in mind, when must we respond to our anticipated conflicts?

The Characters

  • A character is someone strategically placed to enter and engage with the fulfillment of the single climatic scene.
  • Characters are hired to live the story.

Story is designed by God.

  • God creates us to desire and to want something.
  • He created people to want each other, land, to learn.
  • God increases the conflict in people’s lives to teach them the value of what they should pursue.
  • God gives us a blank page on which to write.
  • With Him, tell a really hard beautiful story.
  • Risk, take the chance, engage people… pursue the single climatic scene.

About Tim Schraeder

Tim Schraeder is obsessed with all things social media. Having worked with some of the world’s largest churches and para-church organizations, he served as an evangelist for social media with a knack for connecting people and spreading ideas that matter. He’s been a consultant and coach as well as a sought-after speaker and author who helped write the book on communication and social media for the church. Today, Tim is passionate to help businesses and organizations connect, engage, and build loyal followers across all forms of social media. He is a die-hard Chicagoan who can be found in any neighborhood coffeeshop that has free wifi.

  • http://twitter.com/timschraeder timschraeder

    #echo10 notes from @donaldmilleris http://bit.ly/93EAzp

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/JilSherman JilSherman

    RT @timschraeder: #echo10 notes from @donaldmilleris http://bit.ly/93EAzp

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/DavisSeal DavisSeal

    RT @timschraeder: #echo10 notes from @donaldmilleris http://bit.ly/93EAzp

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/travismaclay travismaclay

    RT @timschraeder: #echo10 notes from @donaldmilleris http://bit.ly/93EAzp

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/toflee toflee

    RT @timschraeder: #echo10 notes from @donaldmilleris http://bit.ly/93EAzp

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/Whowuddathunkit Whowuddathunkit

    RT @timschraeder: #echo10 notes from @donaldmilleris http://bit.ly/93EAzp

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/chrisfromcanada chrisfromcanada

    Reading notes from @donmilleris talk at #echo10 – wow. Feels like there is TONS of gold in that talk – http://bit.ly/dtijEx

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/MarcScott MarcScott

    RT @chrisfromcanada: Reading notes from @donmilleris talk at #echo10 – wow. Feels like there is TONS of gold in that talk – http://bit.ly/dtijEx

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

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